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March 31, 2014

American Eagle will have a hard time growing, American CEO Parker says

At an industry event in Sao Paulo on Monday, American Airlines chief executive Doug Parker said its regional carrier, American Eagle, will have a hard time growing now that the pilots have rejected a contract offer from management.

According to this Reuters report, Parker said American is seeking other regional airlines to operate the new Embraer E175 it had ordered to be used at Eagle.

"Other regional airlines have been able to bring in new aircraft at lower costs," Parker said in the article.

Last week, American Eagle's pilots overwhelming rejected a 10-year contract that would have given the larger aircraft to the regional carrier in exchange for pilot pay scale freezes until 2018.

-Andrea Ahles

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Comments

American Eagle (Envoy) Employee

American Eagle... It has always been an inside joke the we were the "Redheaded-stepchild" of American Airlines, well with the soon to be name change, the majority of us feel that we have now become the "Orphaned Redheaded-stepchild". And it has had a devastating effect on the morale within the rank and file employee group.
Comments such as the ones that Mr. Parker has stated in the above story does not help one bit.
Sir, we at Eagle (Envoy) understand that you want the American Airline Group (AAG) to survive and be profitable and so do we, Not only do most of us take pride in the jobs that we do, but we also acknowledge that all of our futures are tied to the success of AAG. Having said that, I believe that you, Mr.Parker need to review his stance on this whole situation. You need to be thinking of how to develop a business plan that incorporates the smooth feed of regional revenue passengers into your mainline seats and you can not do that by playing one subsidiary regional airline of another or off a contract carrier. the employees won't stand for, the stockholders won't stand for it, and most important the paying revenue passenger will not stand for it. Mr. Parker, I know what you're thinking... the paying passenger is only interested in the cheapest ticket price... well you're wrong sir. What people what is value for their hard earned dollar and a cheap ticket does not nessarally mean value.
It means professionalism, service, care and most of all respect.
Mr. Parker, when people see you squeezing the nickel so hard that the "indian is riding the buffalo" they are going to take a long hard look at just what value they are going to get and I can tell you they are not going to like it.
You have been spending a lot of money on new planes, new advertising, and the new look but to steal a phrase from the last presidential election "You can put Lipstick on the Pig but its still a Pig" and what the the flying public and the frontline employees (not the corporate office Rah-Rahs) see is the same old Pig.
Sir, all the employees and the flying public know is what American was in the resent past, you sir, need to completely change the corporate mentality and get the employees, both mainline and regionals, to work together and so the flying public they matter and that they are not just a dollar sign, that the new American Airlines really is something different in the air. Thats what we at Eagle (Envoy) want, our pride back.
Oh and just a suggestion, why don't just bring all three of our regionals into one. Think of the cost savings from infrastucture overhead, the teamwork, and the labor groups would be easier to deal with.
It would also build the flying public confidence by having everyone working as a team.

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